4 photographs of scholars present the UdeS survey – Information

No less than 4 UdeS images are finalists in the competition proof by image This year. Don’t forget to comment your favorite!
Photo: Provided

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words. It is through visual representations that the competition proof by image de l’Acfas showcases the work and discoveries of Canadian scientists. Of the 20 images on display this year, no less than 4 are from UdeS research students, another demonstration of the incredible talent in popularizing science in our research community.

Every year, research students at UdeS participate in this competition, which allows them to share their passions and publicize their work, as well as promoting the influence of their university.

With their intriguing and beautiful images, our finalists clearly demonstrate that having the soul of a researcher also means being able to communicate their science to all types of audiences.

The popularization of science is an important know-how that makes science known, but also boosts a career in research. At the Université de Sherbrooke, we are keen to open as many doors as possible to our young researchers who want to develop their skills in this area. Having four finalists in the Image Proof contest this year is a source of great pride.

Jean-Pierre Perreault, Vice-Dean for Research and Graduate Studies at UdeS

The names of the winners of the three awards (jury award, human-nature award and public Discovery award) will be announced at the end of September.

Voting is open on the Radio-Canada website until September 25th!

Don’t forget to vote for your favorite UdeS image. Visit the website ofhere Radio Canada and vote for your favorite image.

Mars Hats off to the Arctic

Éloïse Brassard, a pre-doctoral student in applied geomatics (Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences), is a finalist thanks to her image Mars takes its hat off to the Arctic.
Éloïse Brassard, pre-doctoral student in applied geomatics (Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences), is a finalist thanks to her image Mars Hats off to the Arctic.
Photo: Provided

Similarities between the Arctic and the planet Mars? Yea! Pre-doctoral student in applied geomatics (Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences), Éloïse Brassard photographed these glaciers surrounded by rock formations (in false colors) on Axel Heiberg Island in Nunavut.

The orange-yellow areas are called “gossans”. These are surface deposits, rich in oxidized iron, which testify to an acidic environment conducive to the development of certain life forms. There is also a mineral whose crystalline structure can retain traces of life: jarosite, a biomarker found on Mars! Using soil analyses, the researcher is exploring a method to locate these “gossans” in satellite images of the Canadian Arctic. This knowledge will then be applied to satellite images of Mars. Who knows if microscopic Martians do not inhabit the planet!

Mouflon, sprout and snack

Rachel Bergeron, a pre-doctoral student in biology (Faculty of Science), is a finalist thanks to her image of Mouflon, bud and collage.
Rachel Bergeron, Predoctoral Student in Biology (Faculty of Science), is a finalist thanks to her image Mouflon, sprout and snack.
Photo: Provided

This young bighorn sheep proudly wears its state-of-the-art UdeS earrings, which will allow it to be easily detected by researchers. Rachel Bergeron, a pre-doctoral student in biology (Faculty of Science), is interested in the survival and reproduction of bighorn sheep that live in the Ram Mountain region of Alberta. She works with a team at the University of Sherbrooke who have been capturing and tagging these impressive animals since 1991 in order to better understand certain aspects related to their survival and reproduction, assess the effects of environmental conditions on birth, explore the consequences of climate change and much more. most.

in the light of the peaks

Bastien Vandendaele, a pre-doctoral student in applied geomatics (Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences), is a finalist thanks to his image À la lumier des cimes.
Bastien Vandendaele, pre-doctoral student in applied geomatics (Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences), is a finalist thanks to his image in the light of the peaks.
Photo: Provided

This amazing image is the work of Bastien Vandendaele, a pre-doctoral fellow in applied geomatics (FLSH). You are wandering here in the middle of the digital forest. You can see the top of a wooden stand that a researcher captured from the ground using a portable mobile lidar. This device uses the light waves emitted by a laser to reconstruct each trunk and each branch by gathering millions of points.

In just a few minutes, Bastien and his companions collect valuable data for forest management: the diameter, height and volume of trees. In the age of the digital revolution, data from this type of sensor can be the hobbyhorse of the new generation of forest inventories.

underground alliances

Joey Chamard and Jonathan Rondeau-Leclaire, pre-doctoral students in biology (Faculty of Science), are finalists thanks to their Underground Alliances image.
Joey Chamard and Jonathan Rondeau-Leclaire, pre-doctoral students in biology (Faculty of Science), are finalists thanks to their image underground alliances.
Photo: Provided

Do you like mushrooms? Let’s bet you’ve never had anything like it on your plate. Joey Chamard and Jonathan Rondeau-Leclaire, pre-doctoral students in biology (Faculty of Science), do not eat them, but are very interested in them out of concern for the environment.

In the image, an ectomycorrhizal fungus deposited its star-shaped spores on a sugar maple root. Unlucky for this species of Inocybe, as this maple has an exclusive relationship with endomycorrhizae! If “ecto”, the mushrooms cover the root and its cells; if they are “endo”, they settle inside these root cells. All mycorrhizal fungi maintain a symbiotic relationship that provides their hosts with minerals, promotes their productivity and alleviates environmental stresses. Scientists “encourage” this union to reduce climate shocks to native tree populations.

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